Tag Archives: Pediatricians

Colds and the Flu – Revisiting SPC Episode 48

Colds and the Flu – Revisiting SPC Episode 48

It seems like every year the season for colds and the flu gets longer. Whether you’re a parent of a special needs child or not, our kids are coming down with colds and the flu all year round – for that matter, so are we parents. But what exactly are colds and the flu? Did you know that they share some of the same symptoms? How do you tell them apart? What’s the difference between the flu and a 24 hour stomach bug? How do you treat these illnesses and what can you do if you have a special needs child that has sensitivities to medicines or has challenges with standard treatments?

Why Do Colds And The Flu Affect Kids Differently Than Adults?

For this episode of Special Parents Confidential we are joined again by our friend Dr. Patricia Schultz, who has some answers. Including ways that you can help treat kids who have aversions to medicines. She also talks about the warning signs for when your child might have something else going on instead of the cold or the flu, why dehydration is a huge concern for sick kids, and – most importantly – when it’s time to take your child to the hospital.

Always Call Your Doctor First.

You’ll hear great advice about how colds and the flu, as well as Noroviruses and other illnesses can affect babies and infants, toddlers, younger children, teenagers and adults.  As always, though, Dr. Schultz’s advice is merely for informational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your child’s health, be sure to contact your family health provider or pediatrician.

Links Mentioned In This Podcast.

The Oral Rehydration Solution from The World Health Organization

The Common Cold – What Parents Need To Know. From the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The Flu – Healthy Children from The American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Surviving The Stomach Bug – American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Kids Health – Vomiting 

Kids Health – Diarrhea

Support Special Parents Confidential

If you have found this episode, or any episode of Special Parents Confidential to be helpful, please consider contributing to help support this podcast. Just click on the Support Special Parents Confidential link at the top right of the page to get to our special Pay Pal account so you can make your contribution easily and safely. Any amount you can contribute will help. Thanks for your support!

Special Parents Confidential 48 Colds And The Flu

Colds And The Flu.

It seems like every year the season for colds and the flu gets longer. Whether you’re a parent of a special needs child or not, our kids are coming down with colds and the flu all year round – for that matter, so are we parents. But what exactly are colds and the flu? Did you know that they share some of the same symptoms? How do you tell them apart? What’s the difference between the flu and a 24 hour stomach bug? How do you treat these illnesses and what can you do if you have a special needs child that has sensitivities to medicines or has challenges with standard treatments?

Why Do Colds And The Flu Affect Kids Differently Than Adults?

For this episode of Special Parents Confidential we are joined again by our friend Dr. Patricia Schultz, who has some answers. Including ways that you can help treat kids who have aversions to medicines. She also talks about the warning signs for when your child might have something else going on instead of the cold or the flu, why dehydration is a huge concern for sick kids, and – most importantly – when it’s time to take your child to the hospital.

Always Call Your Doctor First.

You’ll hear great advice about how colds and the flu, as well as Noroviruses and other illnesses can affect babies and infants, toddlers, younger children, teenagers and adults.  As always, though, Dr. Schultz’s advice is merely for informational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your child’s health, be sure to contact your family health provider or pediatrician.

Links Mentioned In This Podcast.

The Oral Rehydration Solution from The World Health Organization

The Common Cold – What Parents Need To Know. From the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The Flu – Healthy Children from The American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Surviving The Stomach Bug – American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Kids Health – Vomiting 

Kids Health – Diarrhea

Support Special Parents Confidential

If you have found this episode, or any episode of Special Parents Confidential to be helpful, please consider contributing to help support this podcast. Just click on the Support Special Parents Confidential link at the top right of the page to get to our special Pay Pal account so you can make your contribution easily and safely. Any amount you can contribute will help. Thanks for your support!

Special Parents Confidential Episode 40 Child Medication Errors.

Child Medication Errors.

Have you ever checked your child’s medications to see if you’re giving them the right medicine? Of course you have. Have you ever checked your own ability to measure out the correct dose of medicine? Are you certain your measuring ability and the tools you’re using to measure the medications are accurate? Child Medication Errors are much more common than you think.

This is a subject that’s not just for parents of special needs kids, but for all parents. The simple fact of the matter is if you are the parent of a child who has ever been prescribed a medication or has taken over the counter medications for any reason, and if you have used any kind of liquid medication, you have probably made some dosing errors whether you realize it or not.

Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools, a Randomized Controlled Experiment.

In October of 2016 a study was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics that showed that greater than 84 percent of parents who participated in the study made some kind of error when measuring a liquid dose of medicine, with 68 percent of those errors being an overdose, and twenty percent of the errors being double the amount of medication that was prescribed. The study is called Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools, a Randomized Controlled Experiment, and it’s the first time a study was done on how accurately parents measured out medicine dosages using standard medicine measuring tools. It was conducted at three separate clinics in New York City, Stanford California, and Atlanta Georgia. Over two thousand parent volunteers enrolled in the study to have their measuring accuracy evaluated.

Preventing Child Medication Errors: How Accurate Are Your Measuring Tools?

The study looked at several medicine measuring tools including the small plastic measuring cups that are commonly included with over-the-counter medications, liquid measuring syringes (not the kind used in vaccinations), kitchen measuring spoons, and tableware. The degree in variations of accuracy between all these measuring tools was astonishing and alarming.

Our guest for this episode is our friend, Dr. Patricia Schultz, who is an Osteopathic Physician and medical consultant in Chicago. She talks about the results of the study, some of the most common mistakes parents make when using measuring tools, and the dangers of incorrect dosages of medications for kids. She discusses which of the measuring tools tested was the most accurate, how to check with your doctor and your pharmacist to make sure you’re measuring accurately, and whether or not homeopathic medicines are really safer than pharmaceutical medications. You’ll find out how to prevent Child Medication Errors.

Links Mentioned In This Podcast:

Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools, a Randomized Controlled Experiment – The full study reported from the American Academy of Pediatrics. You can read the entire article on the website or download a .pdf copy.

Third Party Evaluation Programs for the Quality of Dietary Supplements – from the American Botanical Council’s HerbalGram. This article introduces the seven United States based institutions that exist who certify the quality and reliability of herbal supplements, dietary supplements, and homeopathic medications.

The American Academy of Pediatrics – The best source of accurate and credible medical information for children.

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Special Parents Confidential Episode 38 All About ER

All About ER.

For some parents of Special Needs Children, trips to the ER – Emergency Room – can become as frequent as going on family outings. Those trips can be frightening for both the parents, the special needs child, and the siblings. What can parents do to minimize trips to the ER? When is a trip to the ER necessary?  What can parents do to minimize their children’s fears when going to the emergency room? Additionally, what should parents do to make sure their concerns are being met? 

For this episode, we are fortunate to have as a guest, Doctor Patricia Schultz an emergency medicine trained physician.  After finishing residency and practicing in the ER for a few years, she found her real passion was utilizing her medical training to help patients and families get the best medical care possible. She also taught medical students how to perform to the best of their abilities while having the utmost empathy, respect and compassion for their patients.  Dr. Schultz is currently a healthcare consultant in the private sector, and is working on writing her second book. 

She talks about how parents can lessen children’s fears of the ER and the doctor’s office in general. What parents can do to help doctors and staff members understand the unique challenges our kids face. How parents can best advocate for their kids. How to make sure that in an over-worked environment like a busy ER, that the staff is really focusing on our children.

Dr. Schultz also discusses what parents should do when conflicts arise with the medical staff, which unfortunately can happen. The dangers of trying to diagnose our kid’s medical problems through internet searches. Finally, why it’s important to follow up an ER visit with an appointment to your family doctor or pediatrician.

Disclaimer:  Dr. Schultz’ contributions in this episode are for informational purposes only. Always talk your family physician or pediatrician before trying any kind of medical treatment, therapy, or medication.

Links Mentioned In This Podcast

American Academy of Pediatrics – Their main website page.

Healthy Children From The AAP – Website from the American Academy of Pediatrics that allows for customizing your family health information.

The Mayo Clinic Symptoms Page – Database of illnesses, symptoms, and first aid treatments.

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7 Myths About Medication – From The Cleveland Clinic

7 Myths About Medication and The Facts Behind Them. From The Cleveland Clinic

Medications of any kind are always a difficult decision for not only parents of special needs children but all parents. So we are pleased to be able to share an article that has great common sense advice on taking medications from the Cleveland Clinic:

7 Myths About Medication – and The Facts Behind Them

This article is mostly about over-the-counter (OTC) medications and information for adults, but much of the information applies to prescription medications and children taking medications as well.

We would add one more bit of advice that we have been given from our own pediatrician as well as other people we know in the medical profession: When giving any kind of OTC medication to a child, make sure you use your child’s weight for the dosage, rather than their age. Why? Body mass has much more of an effect on how you absorb medication than your age, and to a far greater degree with children. Some kids don’t grow as quickly as others and can weigh much less than the average for kids their age, which means for those kids a dose measured to the amount for their age would actually be too much.

Always get your medical information from reliable sources, like the Cleveland Clinic. Other good sources are The American Academy of PediatricsThe Mayo Clinic and Web MD. You can also find links to excellent information from reliable sources on our Helpful Links page.

Avoid the myths about medication and always follow your doctor’s advice.